Wednesday , 8 July 2020

Tuesday, June 30th

Here is today’s news on mymix1041.com, sponsored by Toyota of Cleveland:

From the Chattanoogan…

A Cleveland man was one of two people killed in a crash on I-24 In Rutherford County on Friday night in which a car drove across the grass median and hit a car going the other way.

One of two victims in the car that crossed the median was identified as James Black, 49, of Cleveland.

Another person who was in the front of that vehicle also died.

The left rear passenger was taken to Vanderbilt Hospital and the right rear passenger was taken to Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital. 

The driver of the car that was hit, Matthew Coppernoll, 41, was taken to St. Thomas Rutherford Hospital by private car.

Authorities say they do not know why the car went over into the eastbound lanes.

The wreck was just past the Joe B. Jackson Parkway exit.

From WRCB Channel 3…

Tennessee Governor Bill Lee has extended the state of emergency concerning the COVID-19 pandemic through August 29.

Executive Order 50 allows the continued suspension of various regulations “in order to facilitate the treatment and containment of COVID-19.”

The order urges people to continue limiting activity and stay home when possible.

It also urges people to wear a face covering when close to others and avoid gatherings of 50 or more.

In news today…

The Bradley County Jail continues to work in compliance with all COVID-19 guidelines mandated by the Tennessee Corrections Institute (TCI). Jail administration has and will work closely with authorities at TCI; likewise, jail medical staff has and will work closely with the Bradley County Health Department, following the mandated guidelines. 

All incoming inmates booked at the Bradley County Jail will receive a COVID-19 screening from a nurse with the jail’s medical staff during his/her intake process. During this intake process, the nurse conducts a question-and-answer screening, inquiring if the inmate is experiencing any symptoms relating to COVID-19, if the inmate suspects that he/she has contracted or has been exposed to COVID-19 and if the inmate has been out of the country in the past two months. The inmate being screened is then offered the opportunity to receive testing for COVID-19, which comes at no cost to the inmate. Each inmate has the option to refuse testing, if he/she does not wish to be tested. This screening is recorded and documented with signatures from both the inmate and the nurse.

Following this screening process, if there is no indication of illness, the inmate’s pod assignment is defaulted to a designated isolation pod, where he/she will remain in isolation for 14-days, to ensure that he/she is free of COVID-19. While in isolation, the inmate’s temperature is checked once every 12 hours (twice daily) and is given an opportunity to report any contracted symptoms relating to the virus. Once his/her 14-day isolation is completed, the inmate will then be assigned and transferred to a regular pod to serve the rest of his/her time. If, at any point, an isolated inmate shows confirmed signs of contracting the virus, he/she will be transferred to the designated quarantine pod.

Whether the inmate is in or out of isolation, he/she may request and receive medical attention or COVID-19 testing.

If the inmate posts bond or for any other reason does not remain in custody for 14-days, he/she will not be required to complete the full 14-day isolation. 

If and when the aforementioned screening process indicates that an incoming inmate is experiencing any symptoms relating to COVID-19, has a fever or tests positive after a voluntary COVID-19 test, he/she will immediately be assigned to a designated quarantine pod. When an inmate is placed in the quarantine pod, he/she will remain there for 14-days. 

There are currently 33 inmates in the designated quarantine pod, who have all tested positive for COVID-19, but have remained asymptomatic.

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Wednesday, July 8th

Here is today’s news on mymix1041.com, sponsored by Toyota of Cleveland: Topping our news today… …

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